20 Vintage Photos Of Las Vegas Before It Became Sin City 0 16

When you think of Las Vegas, you probably think of chiming slot machines, strippers, and the strip flanked by huge brightly lit casino hotels. But it wasn’t always that way. Once upon a time, Las Vegas, Nevada was just this dusty little town that had a few low-profile casinos. Take a look back at vintage Las Vegas for some serious nostalgia.

Las Vegas, 1906

Daily Mail

The San Pedro, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake Railroad was officially completed in 1905, and what was left behind was a cute little desert town far smaller than what you’d find today.

Fremont Street, 1921

Lake-Eglington/UNLV Special Collections

Fremont Street, which would later become the most happening part of Las Vegas, was little more than a small town main street in 1921.

Gambling Casino, 1935

Daily Mail

Because of the construction of the Hoover Dam in the early 1930s, there was a huge influx of people living and working in Las Vegas. Gambling was legalized in 1931 and casinos started popping up soon after.

Fremont Street, 1944

Ed Clark/UNLV Special Collections

Once casinos became such a big attraction, Fremont Street was the main drag that drew in gamblers.

Golden Nugget, 1950s

Neat Stuff

After World War II, there was a huge boom for Las Vegas gambling. So many new casinos and hotels popped up between 1946 and 1955, though still barely anything compared to what you see now.

Vegas Vic

Neat Stuff

The neon cowboy for the Pioneer Club, named Vegas Vic, was a staple of Fremont street. People who had never even been to Vegas could recognize him.

Las Vegas Casino, 1950s

Neat Stuff

The interiors of casinos looked a lot different back then compared to now. For one thing, they were a lot brighter inside.


All That Is Interesting

Las Vegas showgirls were a huge attraction, and even the smallest casinos had shows.

Frank Sinatra, 1955

Daily Mail

In the 1950s, Las Vegas was frequented by a laundry list of big-name celebrities, and Frank Sinatra was a king among famous men.

Miss Atomic Bomb, 1957


Vegas also drew people in with atomic bomb testing. They detonated their first atomic bomb in the desert outside of town, with a huge crowd watching in 1951. They went on to detonate over 100 bombs at the Nevada Test Site.

Fremont Street


Over the years, Fremont street became more brightly lit. Neon signs filled the sky, many of which had moving parts like the famous cowboy sign.

Las Vegas From Above, 1964

Daily Mail

Las Vegas began to change. While Fremont Street in downtown Las Vegas was the place to be, Las Vegas Boulevard, known as the Las Vegas Strip, became the new happening area to build huge casinos.

The Lights Of Las Vegas, 1966

Keystone-france/Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images

After a while, the lights on Fremont Street began to have a retro feel. It was seen as the old-fashioned part of Vegas.

Tanya The Elephant, 1966

Daily Mail

Vegas was not opposed to publicity stunts. When Tanya, an elephant that performed at the Dunes Hotel and Casino, played at the blackjack table, people loved it.

Woman Playing Craps, 1963.


The late ’60s brought a lot of racial tension in Las Vegas. Segregation was a national issue at the time.

Sahara, 1960s


When city officials were slow to desegregate, the crime bosses that ran Las Vegas casinos put the pressure on. After all, they wanted to make more money by allowing everyone into their casinos, regardless of color.

Dunes Hotel


When the 1970s came along, there was a huge boom in the Las Vegas population. More and more people were flocking to the casinos.

Entering Las Vegas, 1970s

Keystone-france/Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images

Since the Las Vegas strip became the mecca for gambling, they built this “Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas” sign in 1959. What’s funny is that the Las Vegas Strip isn’t actually in Las Vegas. It’s just outside the city limits.

Caesar’s Palace, 1971


As time went on, hotels and casinos got bigger and more lavish. Caeser’s Palace was the first completely themed hotel on the Strip.

Fremont Street, 1979

Gary Thompson/Las Vegas Review-Journal

People have mixed feelings about Las Vegas now. Gamblers love a night of losing money, but, as you can see from this graffiti, others think it’s a town of moral decay. What do you think?

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13 Reasons Why Caligula Was The Most Insane And Depraved Roman Emperor Ever 0 5

Historians have long struggled to explain notorious Roman Emperor Caligula’s behavior. During his short reign, Caligula did everything from engage in public incest to order an innocent 12-year-old to be raped and murdered—making him one of the most hated people in Roman history.

He Wasn’t Considered Very Good Looking

Phas/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Caligula—whose real name was Gaius—was born into a Roman dynasty. His father, respected general Germanicus, used to bring him along to battles, and dressed him up in a miniature version of Roman battle gear. The troops were enamored with the little general, and gave him the nickname “Caligula,” which meant, “little boots.” Eventually, Caligula grew up, but he wasn’t considered particularly handsome. He was tall, gangly, pale, and had a bald head but a super hairy body. When he first took the throne, Roman citizens mocked him and claimed he looked like a goat. Eventually, Caligula got fed up with the mockery and made it a crime for anyone to mention goats in his presence.

He Was Super Paranoid And Had His Family Members Killed

Ancient Origins

While Caligula’s crazy behavior started when he outlawed the act of mocking his appearance, he soon became extremely suspicious of almost everyone in Rome. A few months after Caligula was appointed Emperor, he became seriously ill. Caligula, who believed someone had tried to kill him with poison, never truly recovered from the illness. Although his health was restored in a bodily sense, he was mentally never the same. After the incident, he became extremely paranoid and obviously a little insane. In some of his first acts of paranoia, he accused his loved ones of treason and ordered to have them murdered or exiled.

After He Got Sick, Everyone Thought He Was Crazy

Ancient Origins

Initially, most of Rome was happy to have Caligula as a ruler. He won over his people when he granted members of the military large bonuses, got rid of unfair taxes, and freed anyone who had been sent to prison unlawfully. However, after he fell ill, he started behaving really erratically. While some dubbed him insane, modern historians believe there is evidence that suggests he was suffering from epilepsy and lived in constant fear of seizures. He was known to stand outside and speak to the moon, and the effects of a full moon were once linked to epileptic episodes. He was also fond of just staring off into the distance and was constantly irritable, which are both signs of hyperthyroidism.

He Murdered People Left And Right

Dea / V. Pirozzi/De Agostini/Getty Images

If Caligula had spent his time as Emperor staring off into space and lashing out at his family, his legacy probably wouldn’t have been so bad. But, as luck has it, his extreme paranoia, emotional instability, and limitless power all came together to mold him into one bloodthirsty killer. After just a few months as Emperor, he started ordering seemingly anyone who crossed him to be murdered. His behavior became outlandish, and before long almost all of Rome hated him.

He Enjoyed Torturing People


For some reason, hanging or chopping people’s heads off doesn’t seem out of character for an Emperor—and probably wouldn’t even be considered that evil in the scheme of things. But Caligula wasn’t just murder crazy—he was torture crazy. He derived loads of pleasure out of torturing people, and even turned torture sessions into public events. He once had a man tied down and beaten with chains for three months, bringing him out of a dungeon and onto the street where people would gather when they smelled the man’s gangrenous brain.

Caligula Was Obsessed With Body Mutilation

Raw Read

In addition to publicly beating people, Caligula liked to mutilate people’s bodies. Apparently, his favorite torture device was the saw. He had a special saw blade that was modeled after the human spine and could cut someone along the spinal cord from the top of the chest to the crotch in one swoop. The worst thing about the blade was that it caused blood to rush to the victim’s brain, making it impossible for them to pass out. That, of course, meant they actually had to endure every moment of the torture.

He Had A Killer Appetite For Testicles


As if a gross serial killer saw blade wasn’t bad enough, Caligula also like to chew on the testicles of his victims. He would have someone tie down a victim, and then he would slowly nibble on the testicles while they were restrained upside down. Obviously, Caligula had an insatiable appetite for torture. One of his favorite public events, the Circus Maximus, involved throwing criminals into big pits where they were devoured by starved wild animals. He particularly loved when the hungry lions would go after victims. Once, when the criminals ran out before the lions were brought on, he had random people pulled from the stands to participate in the deadly event.

He Thought He Was A Living God

Hulton Archive/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Eventually, Caligula fell off the deep end when he started publicly exclaiming he was a living God, and ordered his Roman Empire to treat him accordingly. One of his first acts as a living God was ordering the construction of a bridge between the palace and the Temple of Jupiter (the most significant temple in Rome) so that he could regularly hobnob with other deities. Additionally, Caligula started dressing up like Gods, demigods, and goddesses—including Hercules, Mercury, Venus, and Apollo. As if the costumes and outrageous orders weren’t enough, he also referred to himself as “God” in the third person and had the faces removed from god statues in Roman temples and replaced with his face.

He Tried To Appoint His Horse As A Priest


Amongst all of the bloodthirsty murders, Caligula tried to have his horse Incitatus (Galloper) appointed as a priest and consul. Caligula took the instatement so seriously he actually had a huge pure marble stable built for the horse and filled it with the most lavish furnishings. Of course, the horse never sat on the luxurious chairs or couches, and instead preferred to hang around the servants who fed him oats mixed with gold flakes.

He Had A Whole Family Publicly Executed

Hulton Archive/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Perhaps one of the most evil acts Caligula ever committed came when he had an entire family publicly executed. The debacle began when a Roman citizen had the guts to insult the hated leader to his face. Caligula responded by ordering guards to tie the man down and beat him with chains. At the same time, he sent other guards to gather the man’s family, and one by one he had the children publicly executed from oldest to youngest.

Caligula Took His Public Executions Too Far

Look And Learn

The crowd was so disgusted with the spectacle they started to revolt, and Caligula responded by focusing on the last remaining member of the family, a 12-year-old girl. The girl was a sorry sight—she had just watched her entire family get murdered, and was sitting sobbing in the street. According to Roman law, Caligula couldn’t execute her because she was still a virgin. As a way around that, Caligula coldly ordered the executioner to rape and then strangle her.

He Was Rumored To Have Had Public Sex With His Sisters


While his murder and torture rampages are pretty well documented, few people actually made official records about his acts of incest. In fact, only one historian, Suetonius (who was known to be pretty gossipy) published claims that Caligula had sex with his sisters in the open at banquets while guests walked around them. Other chroniclers, who lived the same time as Caligula, never mentioned his sisterly trysts.

Some Thought He Was Possessed By A Demon

Ancient Origins

While some ancient historians claimed he was into incest, others, who were persuaded by the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faiths, believed he was straight up possessed by a demon. Eventually, Caligula’s bad reputation got him killed a year before his 30th birthday. And, fittingly, he was stabbed to death in public right after he left his favorite event, the Circus Maximus. In the end, Caligula was so hated by the Roman people that they left his body to rot in the street and his remains were eaten by dogs.

12 Bizarre Victorian Slang Terms We Should Totally Bring Back 0 12

The Victorian era was not all prim and proper. In fact, people back then used quite a few creative and dirty slang terms. And it’s about time we brought back a handful of these totally funny and crafty phrases.

Bitch The Pot


In Victorian times, ‘bitch the pot’ meant pour the tea. We wonder how waitresses or waiters would respond today when told to ‘bitch the pot.’

Beer And Skittles

Wikimedia Commons

“Beer and skittles” meant having a good time during the Victorian era. Truthfully, beer and skittles still sounds like a good time.



“DAMFINO” was an abbreviated curse, which meant “damned if I know.” Who knew people in the Victorian times also loved to abbreviate curses?

Jammiest Bits Of Jam

Wikimedia Commons

In the Victorian era, if you were called the “jammiest bits of jam” it meant that you were an absolute perfect young female.



“Arfarfan’arf” meant a very drunk man. This Victorian slang term in particular might be worth bringing back.


Tumblr/Faces of the Victorian Era

“Chuckaboo” is today’s equivalent of BFF or your #squad.

Not Up To Dick


“Not up to dick” was something people in the Victorian era would say when they weren’t feeling well. Today, that means something slightly different.

Toast Your Blooming Eyebrows

Keystone-france/Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images

“Toast your blooming eyebrows” was a creative Victorian way of saying “fuck off.”

Mutton Shunter

Flickr/Greater Manchester Police

A “Mutton shunter” was the Victorian way of calling police, “pigs.”

To Snuff A Bloke’s Candle

The Daily Mail

“To snuff a bloke’s candle” meant to kill someone.


LSU Library Archives

A “strumpet” was slang for a prostitue.



In the Victorian era church bells not only helped people kept track of time and their daily prayers, but it was also a slang term for a talkative woman.

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